FROM CRITICALLY ENDANGERED TO ENDANGERED!

Since 1996 the Mountain Gorilla according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has been classified as Critically Endangered. Today, the IUCN has announced that the mountain gorilla is now re-classified as Endangered. Thanks to the effective efforts of all conservation stakeholders, together we are making progress. Whereas this signals an improvement, the mountain gorillas still need a lot of protection and monitoring to survive. The IUCN statement can be found at: English; https://www.iucn.org/news/species/201811/fin-whale-mountain-gorilla-recovering-thanks-conservation-action-iucn-red-list

French; https://www.iucn.org/fr/news/species/201811/rorqual-commun-et-gorille-des-montagnes-en-voie-de-recuperation-grace-aux-efforts-de-conservation-liste-rouge-de-luicn

 According to the IGCP Director Anna Behm Masozera “The mountain gorilla is today better off than it was even a decade ago thanks to the incredible commitment and efforts from so many individuals and institutions – from park rangers to policy makers to community members – and the donors and tourism industry who support these efforts. The future for mountain gorillas is equally hopeful and challenged, as we face the threats which could quickly undo the gains we’ve made – from the introduction of existing and emerging human disease to degradation of their protected habitat. Safeguarding the mountain gorilla from these threats should be our collective priority.”

 The review of the IUCN red list was led by the IGCP Conservation Scientist Jena R. Hickey, PhD. Commenting on the current status Jena says “While we celebrate this improved conservation status of mountain gorillas, which is a true success story, we’ll want to stay vigilant with regard to new and on-going stressors to this subspecies. For example, the increased gorilla density poses its own risk: increased risk of disease transmission among the gorillas themselves, potential increased parasite loads, and – at some point – we can expect resource competition among gorillas living in these two finite habitats.”

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